Family Voices: Stories Helping Family Researchers and Practitioners Understand Family Experience

Concurrent Sessions 6

Spencer Olmstead, Jerika Norona, Kristin Anders, Sherria Taylor, De-Ann Lott, Jamal Cooks, Rayshawn Wright, Joseph Ventimiglia, Lucy Mbirianjau; Facilitator: Julie Leventhal

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 14
Session #
230
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 230-01 - Emerging Adults’ Hookup Scripts: Differences Based on Sex and College Attendance?
    By Spencer Olmstead, Jerika Norona, Kristin Anders
  • 230-02 - Through Their Eyes: A Photovoice Project With Black Female Adolescent Athletes Impacted by Community Trauma
    By Sherria Taylor, De-Ann Lott, Jamal Cooks, Rayshawn Wright
  • 230-03 - The Real Meaning of Family
    By Joseph Ventimiglia
  • 230-04 - Sex Stereotypes and Family Burdens on Female Students’ in STEM in Kenyan Universities
    By Lucy Mbirianjau

Facilitator: Julie Leventhal

Abstract(s)

Emerging Adults’ Hookup Scripts: Differences Based on Sex and College Attendance?

By Spencer Olmstead, Jerika Norona, Kristin Anders

Using story-telling methods and directed content analysis, we examined the hookup scripts of 408 college attending and non-college emerging adults. Several themes emerged, including hookup behaviors, partner type, alcohol use, reasons for hooking up, meeting and hookup location, planned nature of hookup, outcomes, emotional reactions, and the use of technology. Several variations emerged within each of these categories. Hookup script components were then compared using chi-square tests based on college attendance and sex. Although several proportional differences were found, participants' scripts were largely consistent across college status and sex. Implications for sexuality and relationship education intervention and prevention are discussed.

Objectives

To examine whether hookup scripts differ among emerging adults based on college attendance status. To examine whether hookup scripts differ among emerging adult men and women. To learn new elements of hookup scripts not previously considered in the hookup literature.

Through Their Eyes: A Photovoice Project With Black Female Adolescent Athletes Impacted by Community Trauma

By Sherria Taylor, De-Ann Lott, Jamal Cooks, Rayshawn Wright

The RISE (Resilience, Identity, and Sexuality Education) Project is aimed at supporting the long-term well-being of adolescent girls impacted by community trauma. Grounded in the principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR), phase one of the RISE Project established rapport and engaged black adolescent female athletes in a Photovoice Project that identified the strengths and challenges of their community. Using Grounded Theory, common resiliene themes were identified and will be used in the development of a family life education program for this population.

Objectives

1) Assess the need for a family life education program among Black female adolescent athletes. 2) Identify community strengths. 3) Identify community challenges.

The Real Meaning of Family

By Joseph Ventimiglia

Notwithstanding formal textbook definitions, students predominantly define the family phenomenologically, deemphasizing consanguineal, affinal, coresidential, and fictive kinship, let alone legal, religious, geographic, nosological, and economic narratives. Some forty classes of  sociology of Family students performed an exercise, first, enumerating family “members,” then identifying themes common to the enumeration.  Even the practical-functional clinical perspective—family is as family does—or the social psychology perspective of family as “a unity of interacting personalities” fared badly compared to the sentimental definition, which often includes nonhuman members.  A plurality of students regard family as a set of members who love one another.  

Objectives

To define family realistically. To explore the evolving cultural legitimation for family. To stimulate thought and discussion.

Sex Stereotypes and Family Burdens on Female Students’ in STEM in Kenyan Universities

By LUCY MBIRIANJAU; Facilitator: Julie Levanthal

    Globally, there is low women participation in STEM disciplines in universities. This is despite existence of policies to redressing this disparity.  This is due to sex stereotypes, prejudices and family burdens on women. This study was conducted in three universities. Questionnaires, interviews, documentary analysis were used for data collection. Study findings were: low female students’ participation in STEM disciplines due to gender stereotypes of STEM disciplines as masculine and family burdens. There is need for educational STEM policies to increase female participation, appropriate STEM mentoring and career guidance. Key words: gender roles, participation, STEM    

Objectives

Study Objectives i. Establish female student’s participation in STEM disciplines in Kenyan public universities between years 2009 to 2013. ii. Investigate sex stereotypes that affect female students’ participation in STEM in Kenyan universities. iii. Establish family burdens that influence female students’ participation in STEM in Kenyan universities.

Bundle name
Conference Session