CFLE Network, a quarterly newsletter published by the National Council on Family Relations for Certified Family Life Educators, is a resource filled with information about Family Life Education. Network provides an opportunity for CFLEs to share their knowledge and expertise with other active CFLEs through research- or practice-based articles.

Editor: Elizabeth L. Morgan, Ph.D., CFLE

Writing for Network: Authors interested in contributing an article to CFLE Network should first review the full author guidelines (PDF).

Advertising in Network: For advertising in Network, see details about opportunities and specs.

 

Call for Articles

Summer 2021: Families and Health

Submit proposals by June 1, 2021
Final article deadline June 15, 2021

This issue of CFLE Network will focus on issues relevant to Families and Health and the practice of Family Life Education.

Please consider contributing an article for the Summer 2021 issue of Network on any topic relevant to Family Life Education and preventative or support services provided for families and their members. Examples of potential topics include the following:

  • Describing the mental and physical health benefits for individuals, families, and communities associated with preventative care.
  • Describing the role Family Life Educators can play in helping families and communities improve their health literacy.
  • Educating policymakers, funders, and others about the role Family Life Educators can play in preventing and ameliorating both physical and mental/behavioral health care issues.
  • Discussing strategies for integrating practices related to cross cultural competence in educational and prevention services associated with physical and mental health.
  • Delivering FLE services related to promoting mental and physical health to families and their members in affordable, equitable, and accessible settings.

Why This Theme?

CFLEs can use their expertise to help families and their communities achieve goals of the Health and Human Services (HHS) Healthy People initiative established in 1990 to improve health and well-being nationwide (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion [ODPHP]; 12/3/2020;  https://bit.ly/3c7DykG).

Every 10 years, ODPHP creates an updated version of Healthy People and sets health and well-being goals and objectives based on progress made toward those previously established, recent research findings, and current national health and well-being realities. The fifth and current version, Healthy People 2030, includes an “increased focus on health equity, social determinants of health, and health literacy, [and]… a new focus on well-being” (ODPHP; 12/3/2020; previously cited). Health literacy encompasses the ability of individuals “to find, understand, and use information and services to inform health-related decisions and actions for themselves and others” and the extent to which organizations “equitably enable individuals” to access the information and services they need to make informed health decisions and engage in healthy behaviors, according to ODPHP (“Health Literacy in Healthy People 2030”; https://bit.ly/3smpzxq).

CFLE knowledge and skills, as delineated in the 10 Family Life Education Content Areas (National Council on Family Relations [NCFR] “Family Life Education Content Areas: Content and Practice Guidelines”; 2020; https://bit.ly/3ccEmVw), are particularly suited to helping individuals, families, and communities increase health equity and health literacy. Several illustrative examples follow:

  • Coaching families how to navigate their local health and human services system, a practice associated with the Families and Individuals in Societal Contexts FLE content area, could help them gain equitable access to the Early Childhood Intervention Services for which their young children qualify.
  • Facilitating effective and informed decision-making, a practice associated with the Family Resource Management FLE content area, could help families choose the mental health services that fits individual member’s needs and their family values.
  • Creating brochures that are information-rich and jargon-free, culturally relevant and respectful, readable and understandable, and are in the client’s preferred language, educational strategies associated with the Family Life Education Methodology FLE content area, could promote equitable access to solution-oriented information about social determinants of health.

 

Fall 2021: Grief and Loss

Submit proposals by Sept. 1, 2021
Article deadline: Sept. 15, 2021

This issue of CFLE Network will address grief associated with clear or ambiguous losses experienced by families and their members. Ambiguous loss, studied extensively by Pauline Boss, a family therapist and NCFR fellow, refers to family members being lost physically without verification of death; lost psychologically, as with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia; or, most recently, to losses associated COVID-19, such as missed family events, missed school events, or missed opportunities that will not return such as attending funerals or annual events (Boss & Tippett, 2020; Ambiguous Loss Resources; https://www.ncfr.org/resources/resource-collections/ambiguous-loss-reso…). Ambiguous loss does not allow for closure: “Because there is no closure, grief is ongoing, sometimes for a lifetime” (2015; Helping Families Learn to Live With Ambiguous Loss; https://www.ncfr.org/ncfr-webinars/helping-families-learn-live-ambiguous-loss).

Please consider contributing an article for the Fall 2021 issue of Network on any topic relevant to Family Life Education and grief associated with clear or ambiguous losses experienced by families and their members. Examples of potential topics include the following:

  • Describing your professional experiences working with families coping with clear loss due to the anticipated or unexpected death of a family member.
  • Describing your professional experiences working with families coping with ambiguous loss due to divorce, remarriage, adoption, foster care, birth of a child with a disability, immigration, or other unclear loss.
  • Developing or providing pertinent services such as programs, classes, support groups, online databases, newsletters, and so on for families coping with clear or ambiguous loss.

Email Beth Morgan, Ph.D., CFLE, CFLE Network Editor, at [email protected] with questions or for more information.

 

Future Issue Themes

  • Winter 2022 Community Partnerships (Intent to Submit Deadline: Dec. 1, Submission Deadline: Dec. 15)

 

Copyright and Permissions

Copyright © 2020 National Council on Family Relations

CFLE Network is a copyrighted publication of the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR). No part of CFLE Network may be reprinted, reproduced, disseminated, or distributed by any means, including for classroom use, without permission of NCFR.

Permissions are available by contacting NCFR. NCFR reserves the right to deny any permission at its sole discretion.

The views expressed in CFLE Network may not represent the views of the entire NCFR organization.