Interpersonal Violence

Concurrent Sessions 4

Jeff Crane, Douglas Smith, Spencer Bradshaw, Jason Whiting, Rachel Dansby, Jaclyn Cravens Pickens, Alyssa Banford, Emel Genc, Yile Su, Jared Durtschi, Lauren Ruhlmann, Austin Beck, Natira Staats, Briana Nelson Goff; Facilitator: Tom Stone Carlson

5:00 PM
6:15 PM
Location
Salon 10
Session #
155
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 155-01 - This is your brain on Violence: Neurological impact of IPV, Alcohol and Attachment
    By Jeff Crane, Douglas Smith, Spencer Bradshaw, Jason Whiting
  • 155-02 - Blaming victims of intimate partner violence: A content analysis of online social media comments
    By Jason Whiting, Rachel Dansby, Jaclyn Cravens Pickens, Alyssa Banford
  • 155-03 - Effect of Psychological Well-being on Transmission of Domestic Violence
    By Emel Genc, Yile Su, Jared Durtschi
  • 155-04 - Adverse Effects of Sexual Assault on Behavioral Health Intensified by Couple Hostility
    By Lauren Ruhlmann, Jared Durtschi, Austin Beck, Natira Staats, Briana Nelson Goff

Facilitator: Tom Stone Carlson

Abstract(s)

This is your brain on Violence: Neurological impact of IPV, Alcohol and Attachment

By Jeff Crane, Douglas Smith, Spencer Bradshaw, Jason Whiting

Despite great strides in research regarding intimate partner violence (IPV), significant amounts of couples continue to experience violence in their relationship each year. Recent survey data suggests that IPV affects approximately 10 million people each year. Very little research has studied the neurological impact of violence and no research has looked exclusively at men in such situations. We conducted a neurological study to examine how key factors such as attachment, and alcohol impacted neurological processing for individuals who had experienced IPV. Results from the current study show the impact that alcohol, IPV and attachment have on a male’s neurological processing.

Objectives

1) Develop an additional approach in the treatment of intimate partner violence that considers attachment 2) To demonstrate the need for using a neurological approach when understanding intimate partner violence 3) To analyze the current deficits in IPV approaches and how neurological studies can contribute to current practice and treatment.

Blaming victims of intimate partner violence: A content analysis of online social media comments

By Jason Whiting, Rachel Dansby, Jaclyn Cravens Pickens, Alyssa Banford

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is common in relationships from many backgrounds. Often times individuals react strongly to IPV with anger, frustration, and blame, which creates a judgmental or blaming stance toward the victim. The purpose of this study was to explore individual's online responses to an accusation of IPV covered by popular media. A content analysis of 400 posts was conducting, finding that over 1/3 of the posters blamed the supposed victim in the case, while only 9% blamed the alleged perpetrator. Additional themes included judgments of the couple relationship, criticism of other commenters, and comments on violence.

Objectives

Participants will be able to describe victim blaming and the associated negative outcomes for victims of intimate partner violence. Participants will be able to explain common opinions about intimate partner violence. Participants will be able discuss the clinical and research implications related to victim blaming and social media activities.

Effect of Psychological Well-being on Transmission of Domestic Violence

By Emel Genc, Yile Su, Jared Durtschi

  Intergenerational transmission of violence is a serious concern. Using a sample of 3,376 participants across 14 years, we tested psychological well-being as a protective factor that may disrupt the association from experiencing violence in adolescence to experiencing violence later on in adult relationships. We found that there was a significant association between exposure to domestic violence in adolescence and adult perpetration and victimization of IPV. Additionally, adolescents’ higher sense of wellness was negatively associated with the violent behaviors toward a partner and risk of victimization of intimate violence in adulthood. Implications for family professionals working with adolescents are discussed.

Objectives

1-Based on the content of the session, I am able to identify potential protective factors that may be linked to reduced transmission of violence. 2-Gain a deeper understanding of how childhood exposure to domestic violence can be transmitted to later adult romantic relationships. 3-List some implications for the clinicians working with IPV clients to reduce current and future IPV.

Adverse Effects of Sexual Assault on Behavioral Health Intensified by Couple Hostility

By Lauren Ruhlmann, Jared Durtschi, Austin Beck, Natira Staats, Briana Nelson Goff

This study explored the association between lifetime experience of sexual trauma and Behavioral health among Army Soldiers. Hostility toward a romantic partner was examined as a moderator. Path analysis results revealed that sexual assault history was associated with increased odds that soldiers reported a major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress, or substance abuse. Hostility toward a romantic partner exacerbated the link between sexual assault and generalized anxiety disorder. Thus, although there are notable long-term consequences of sexual assault on mental health, results suggest that present stress, such as conflict within a relationship, may supersede stress associated with past experiences.

Objectives

1. To analyze the association between sexual assault history and Behavioral health in Army Soldiers. 2. To identify whether relationship hostility moderates the association between sexual assault history and Behavioral health. 3. To demonstrate the importance of assessing for sexual assault history and interpersonal hostility when treating common mental health challenges for Army Soldiers.

Bundle name
Conference Session