Mental and Physical Health and Aging

Concurrent Sessions 6

Annie Johansson, Bryan Cafferky, Maria Monserud, Gregory Smith, Frank Infurna, Eva Zautra, Carol Musil, Megan Dolbin MacNab, Max Crowley, Amy Hosier, Erin Yelland, Allison Goderwis, Aaren Sunderman, Kaylee Seyferth, Lawrence Ganong, Luke T. Russell, Kwangman Ko, Ashton Chapman, Caroline Sanner, Marilyn Coleman, Matthew Hunter Stanfield; Facilitator: Jennifer Doty

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 16
Session #
233
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 233-01 - Cognitive and Mental Health Risk Markers for Elder Maltreatment: A Meta-analysis
    By Annie Johansson, Bryan Cafferky
  • 233-02 - Marital Status and Depressive Symptoms Among Older Mexican Americans
    By Maria Monserud
  • 233-03 - Enhancing SociaI Competence in Custodial Grandfamilies: An Online Program
    By Gregory Smith, Frank Infurna, Eva Zautra, Carol Musil, Megan Dolbin MacNab, Max Crowley
  • 233-04 - Keys to Embracing Aging: A Cooperative Extension Health Challenge
    By Amy Hosier, Erin Yelland, Allison Goderwis, Aaren Sunderman, Kaylee Seyferth
  • 233-05 - Being At Fault for Problems and Judgments About Kinship Responsibility
    By Lawrence Ganong, Luke T. Russell, Kwangman Ko, Ashton Chapman, Caroline Sanner, Marilyn Coleman
  • 233-06 - Sex, Dementia, and Long-Term Care: Public Opinion and Importance of Policy
    By Matthew Hunter Stanfield, Erin Yelland, Kaylee Seyferth

Facilitator: Jennifer Doty

Abstract(s)

Cognitive and Mental Health Risk Markers for Elder Maltreatment: A Meta-analysis

By Annie Johansson, Bryan Cafferky

Elder maltreatment poses a significant public health problem worldwide. This is the first published meta-analysis to analyze cognitive and mental health risk markers associated with elder abuse and neglect. Significant results associated with elder maltreatment were found for depression (r=.27, k = 33, p < .001), alcohol abuse (r=.29, k = 22, p < .001), and PTSD/previous trauma (r=.22, k = 24, p < .001). Results from this meta-analytic study can help inform future work and research regarding cognitive and mental health risk markers for elder maltreatment.

Objectives

By the end of this poster presentation attendees will be able to: 1. Articulate which cognitive and mental health related risk markers are significantly related to elder maltreatment. 2. Identify which of these cognitive and mental health related risk markers are most strongly related to elder maltreatment. 3. Apply this knowledge to inform interventions to better prevent and identify elder maltreatment.

Marital Status and Depressive Symptoms Among Older Mexican Americans

By Maria Monserud

Drawing on seven waves of data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, this paper examines marital status differences in mental health trajectories among older Mexican Americans (65+).  This research employs growth curve models and demonstrates that despite having a higher mean level of depressive symptoms, the recently widowed experienced a similar rate of increase with age to that of the continuously married.  The continuously widowed had a steeper rise with age although they had fewer symptoms at younger ages.  Adjusting for physical health, financial strain, social support, and church attendance partially decreased these disparities.

Objectives

(1) To examine the effect of marital status on trajectories of depressive symptoms among older Mexican Americans. (2) To explore gender variations in marital status differences in these trajectories. (3) To investigate the implications of physical health, financial strain, social support, and church attendance for these trajectories.

Enhancing SociaI Competence in Custodial Grandfamilies: An Online Program

By Gregory Smith, Frank Infurna, Eva Zautra, Carol Musil, Megan Dolbin MacNab, Max Crowley

We describe our innovative online Social Intelligence intervention for enhancing the social competencies of custodial grandmothers and their adolescent grandchildren, aged 12-18.   Focusing on these dyads is critical because both members experience significant early life adversities which result in hypervigilance of others, mistrust, social isolation, interpersonal conflict, and the inability to garner warmth and support from family and friends.  In turn, abundant scientific evidence shows that higher social competence leads to greater physical and emotional well-being across the lifespan.  Attention will be devoted to how treatment-related changes in one member of the dyad influences change in the other over time.

Objectives

1. To recognize the need among custodial grandmothers and their adolescent grandchildren for online social intelligence training. 2. To understand how the conceptual framework for social intelligence training intervention is derived from recent empirical findings and theory within family science. 3. To demonstrate how social intelligence training can yield positive changes across diverse outcomes including enhanced social relationships, net physical and mental health, as well cost savings to families and society.

Keys to Embracing Aging: A Cooperative Extension Health Challenge

By Amy Hosier, Erin Yelland, Allison Goderwis, Aaren Sunderman, Kaylee Seyferth

Health-related decisions that individuals and families make across the lifespan directly affect overall well-being and the ability to age well. Yet many individuals–especially those living in rural areas, continue to make choices which result in poor overall health and high chronic disease rates. Keys to Embracing Aging is a Cooperative Extension educational health intervention aimed at improving overall health. Preliminary results demonstrate knowledge change across a significant number of participants. Currently, 420 individuals across two states are engaging in monthly behavior-change challenges for a period of one year. Data specifically highlighting behavior change will be discussed.  

Objectives

1. To evaluate the effectiveness of the Keys to Embracing Aging 30-Day Extension Challenge. 2. To analyze positive health and safety behaviors among rural Kansans and Kentuckians from a socio-ecological perspective. 3. To demonstrate the value in the Cooperative Extension system’s ability to strengthen families and communities in regards to health and well-being.

Being At Fault for Problems and Judgments About Kinship Responsibility

By Lawrence Ganong, Luke Russell, Kwangman Ko, Ashton Chapman, Caroline Sanner, Marilyn Coleman

In this mixed methods study we investigated the effects of being “at fault” for health problems on judgments about intergenerational helping, governmental aid, and personal responsibility to help oneself. In response to hypothetical family situations in which an older adult needed help, a nationally representative panel of 252 adults generally thought that being at fault for health problems reduced the amount of help younger kin and agencies should provide and increased personal responsibility expectations. Attributions of blame varied across health conditions and type of kin relationship (i.e., bio- versus step-kin). Implications from these findings are relevant for practitioners and policymakers.  

Objectives

To examine the effects of perceived blame on judgments regarding intergenerational aid. To examine the effects of kinship type on judgments regarding intergenerational aid. To assess the effects of gender of older and younger adults on judgments regarding intergenerational aid.

Sex, Dementia, and Long-Term Care: Public Opinion and Importance of Policy

By Matthew Hunter Stanfield, Erin Yelland, Kaylee Seyferth

As LTC facilities begin to serve an aging population with diverse views of sexuality, there is a need to develop policies addressing issues of sexual activity. We conducted a mixed-methods study to understand public perspective involving sexual activity towards older adults with dementia engaging in unknowingly adulterous sexual relations within a LTC facility. Logistic regression analyses revealed an expectation of LTC staff intervention to stop sexual activity in cases of dementia and in instances when sexual activity may lead to an adulterous relationship. From these results, we provide future directions for policy regarding sexual activity and intervention in LTC facilities.

Objectives

1. To understand perceptions of the general public about unknowingly adulterous sexual relationships among individuals with dementia who reside in long-term care, specifically surrounding degree of intimacy and spousal disposition. 2. To understand perceptions of the general public surrounding long-term care staff’s obligation to intervene in and/or inform family members about an ongoing sexual relationship. 3. To demonstrate the substantial need for policy development and application within these, and broader, contexts.

 

 

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