Parenting, Divorce, and Family Therapy

Concurrent Sessions 11

Sarah Wolford, Kendal Holtrop, Gilbert Parra, Alex Zurek, Jessica Lanctot, MaLeaha Semerad, Hannah Doucette, Jeffrey Jackson, Li Ping Su, Richard Miller, Youngjin Kang, Lawrence Ganong; Facilitator: Amber Vennum

11:00 AM
12:15 PM
Location
Salon 14
Session #
413
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 413-01 - "It was Me that they Changed": Examining the Emotional Process of Mothers in PMTO
    By Sarah Wolford, Kendal Holtrop
  • 413-02 - Investigation of the Types of Parent Behaviors that Children Find Hurtful
    By Gilbert Parra, Alex Zurek, Jessica Lanctot, MaLeaha Semerad, Hannah Doucette
  • 413-03 - Family Therapy for Child-related Problems: A Meta-analysis
    By Jeffrey Jackson, Li Ping Su, Richard Miller
  • 413-04 - Divorced Fathers’ Perceptions of Parental Disclosures about Divorce-related Topics to Children
    By Youngjin Kang, Lawrence Ganong

Facilitator: Amber Vennum

Abstract(s)

"It was Me that they Changed": Examining the Emotional Process of Mothers in PMTO

By Sarah Wolford, Kendal Holtrop

The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the emotional process of mothers who participated in an evidence-based parenting intervention. Qualitative data from n=17 mothers who completed the PMTO intervention were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Findings illustrate a systematic process of emotional experience from parenting through crisis, to crisis stabilization, and then into emerging recovery; transformations took place at the individual, relational, and systemic levels. Participants also experienced a powerful transformational shift in both their perception of personal identity as well as within their various family contexts. Implications for family therapists will be discussed. 

Objectives

(1) To recognize current knowledge on intervention effects in parenting interventions and highlight gaps in the literature. (2) To discern the emotional process experienced by mothers in an evidence-based parenting intervention (3) To reflect on how a better understanding of maternal emotional process can inform family therapy work

Investigation of the Types of Parent Behaviors that Children Find Hurtful

By Gilbert Parra, Alex Zurek, Jessica Lanctot, MaLeaha Semerad, Hannah Doucette

This qualitative study investigated the types of actions and/or inactions of parents that children find hurtful. Participants were 18- and 19-year old undergraduate students (n = 194) who were asked to recall events/circumstances in which they felt wronged or hurt by a parent/primary caregiver. Seventeen categories of hurtful events were identified. Four categories had frequencies of 10% or more: Unsupportive of Adolescent's Behaviors/Emotions/Thoughts (28.4%), Criticism (18.6%), Abandonment (15.5%), and Dissatisfaction with Family Structure/Dynamic /Decisions (10.3%). Findings have implications for family-based interventions.

Objectives

1. Identify most common types of hurtful events by parents 2. Identify similarities and differences between codes in this study and prior research 3. Describe method for assessing hurtful events

Family Therapy for Child-related Problems: A Meta-analysis

By Jeffrey Jackson, Li Ping Su, Richard Miller

A meta-analysis of family therapy research with child-focused problems (ADHD, anxiety, depression, Behavioral problems) was conducted by quantitatively aggregating the effect sizes for 69 relevant outcome studies. Results of the meta-analysis indicated family therapy is 2.1 times more effective in alleviating child-related problems than comparison treatments and control conditions. Compared to individual therapy, an additional benefit of family therapy was the improvement of family functioning. Thus, family therapy is not only effective in treating the child-related problems, it also improves family functioning, which has important implications for the well-being of other family members, clinical practice, and public policy.

Objectives

(1) To evaluate the overall effectiveness of family therapy in the treatment of child-related problems. (2) To identify the effectiveness of family therapy in the treatment of specific child-related problems. (3) To evaluate the effectiveness of family therapy for child-related problems in improving family functioning.

Divorced Fathers’ Perceptions of Parental Disclosures about Divorce-related Topics to Children

By Youngjin Kang, Lawrence Ganong

Parental disclosures about divorce-related topics to children are often hurtful to them if they contain harmful messages. Although divorced fathers are important in their children’s lives, little is known about fathers’ perceptions about parental disclosures. Drawing upon family systems and communication privacy management theories, we interviewed 20 divorced fathers to examine their perceptions about parental disclosures. We gathered qualitative data using vignette techniques. Fathers knew when disclosures were inappropriate, recognized children’s negative reactions, and realized fathers’ motivations to disclose. Divorced fathers depended on various criteria to judge disclosures, and they shared strategies to prevent inappropriate disclosures. Implications are discussed.

Objectives

(1) To examine divorced fathers’ beliefs about parental disclosures (i.e., personal information that parents share with their children) of divorce-related topics to children (2) To suggest ways that divorced parents engage in healthy parent-child communication about divorce-related topics based on divorced fathers’ perceptions of parental disclosures (3) To provide therapists and clinicians with possibly useful information who work with divorced parents

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Conference Session