TCRM: Deconstructing Family Norms

TCRM Paper Session 8

Autumn M. Bermea, Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, Lyndal Khaw, Gizem Erdem, Ommay Aiman Safi; Discussants: Suzanne Bartle-Haring and Ramona Faith Oswald; Presider: Katherine R. Allen

8:00 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Salon 2
Session #
106
Session Type
TCRM

About the Session

  • 106-01 - Queer Theory in Family Science: Theorizing the Undoing of Heteronormativity
  • By Autumn M. Bermea, Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, Lyndal Khaw
  • 106-02 - Bowen’s Family Systems Theory From a Cultural Perspective: An Integrative Framework
    By Gizem Erdem, Ommay Aiman Safi

Discussants: Suzanne Bartle-Haring and Ramona Faith Oswald
Presider: Katherine R. Allen

Abstract(s)

Queer Theory in Family Science: Theorizing the Undoing of Heteronormativity

By Autumn M. Bermea, Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, Lyndal Khaw

Queer families have garnered more civil rights (e.g., marriage, parenting) in recent years and often scholarship mirrors this focus. Although this research has been valuable, even critical for access to rights, it inadvertently perpetuates the idea that there is one family in that studies have generally focused on structures such as marriage and parenthood. Our proposal extends from current queer lenses to propose, specifically, a queer family theory that considers queer families who do not fit this model and instead engage in the continuous, active construction of their families.

Bowen’s Family Systems Theory From a Cultural Perspective: An Integrative Framework

By Gizem Erdem, Ommay Aiman Safi; Presiders: Suzanne Bartle-Haring and Ramona Faith Oswald

The hallmark of Bowen’s Family Systems Theory lies in the area of differentiation of self (DoS)– the individual’s ability to balance separateness and connectedness in intimate relationships. However culture is rarely defined as a context of development in processes associated with DoS. We propose Kağıtçıbaşı’s Family Change Theory, particularly her construct of autonomy-relatedness in the context of family and culture, as a potential contribution to systemic thinking in family science and therapy. We will discuss the basic concepts of both theories and outline ways in which an integrative systemic-cultural framework may be achieved in family science research and clinical practice.