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Advancing Family Science / Education and Enrichment Section Professional Development Resource Exchange

Cindy Aamlid, Yanqun Peng, Maxi-Ann Campbell, Tammy Harpel, Alisha Hardman, Dorothy Berglund, Lori Elmore-Staton, Catherine Breneman, Jennifer Doty, Carol Buess, Melissa Fenton, Mollie Buelow, Amy Kelly, Scott Tobias, Jana Meinhold, Sarah Feeney, Doris Cancel-Tirado, Lisa Moyer, Kaye Sears, Brandon Burr, Glee Bertram, Andreae McGinnis, Veronica Barrios, Katia Paz Goldfarb, Jessica Cless, Megan Taylor Kuykendoll, Patrick Cheek, Jennifer Reinke, Julie DellaMattera, Judith Myers-Walls, Joellen Lewsader, Kailyn Wales, Savanna Jellison, Sean Brotherson, Gail Bentley, Shera Thomas-Jackson, Briana Nelson Goff, Nicole Springer, Brooke Hanson, Meagan Scott, Sean Brotherson, Geoffrey Zehnacker, Tonya Ricklefs, Jessica Cless, Carolyn Henry, Todd Spencer, Chao Liu, Scott Plunkett, Dave Smallen, Geoffrey Zehnacker, Sean Brotherson, Brooke Hanson, Bridget Walsh, Rose Steffen, Sara Schmitt, Irem Korucu, Lindsey Bryant, David Purpura, Stephanie Krauthamer Ewing, Annika Karlsen

 

8:15 PM
9:30 PM
Location
Pacific Salon 3
Session #
159
Session Type
Resource Exchange
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Advancing Family Science
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 159-01 - 159-01 - Using Photovoice to Uncover Perceptions of Poverty
    By Cindy Aamlid
  • 159-02 - 159-02 - Empowering International Teaching Assistants and Engaging students: Addressing the Use of Linguistic Evaluations to Express Culture and Other Bias
    By Yanqun Peng, Maxi-Ann Campbell
  • 159-03 - 159-03 - Pedagogical Strategies for Addressing the Challenges of Teaching Family Policy
    By Tammy Harpel
  • 159-04 - 159-04 - Increasing Critical Thinking and Practical Skills Through Problem-Based Learning Simulations
    By Alisha Hardman, Dorothy Berglund, Lori Elmore-Staton
  • 159-05 - 159-05 - Interprofessional Collaboration: Getting Family Science on the Team
    By Catherine Breneman
  • 159-06 - 159-06 - Teaching Translational Research and Dissemination to Family Science Students Through an Infographic Assignment
    By Jennifer Doty, Carol Buess, Melissa Fenton, Mollie Buelow (ADDED MELISSA FENTON AS CO-AUTHOR)
  • 159-07 - 159-07 - Creating and Facilitating Webinars: A Tool for Family Science Professionals to Engage Learners
    By Amy Kelly, Scott Tobias
  • 159-08 - 159-08 - Building Authentic Relationships With Students From Diverse Backgrounds: Reflections and Recommendations
    By Jana Meinhold, Sarah Feeney, Doris Cancel-Tirado
  • 159-09 - 159-09 - GIFs, Memes, and Infographics, Oh My! Using Technology to Enhance Student Engagement and Understanding in Family Science Courses
    By Lisa Moyer
  • 159-10 - 159-10 - You May Be What They Were Then:  A Look at Your Family Through the Use of a Genogram or Family Tree
    By Kaye Sears, Brandon Burr, Glee Bertram, Andreae McGinnis
  • 159-11 - 159-11 - The Intersection of Teaching and My Identity
    By Veronica Barrios, Katia Paz Goldfarb
  • 159-12 - 159-12 - Trigger Warning: Teaching Sensitive Topics Online
    By Jessica Cless, Megan Taylor Kuykendoll
  • 159-13 - 159-13 - The Use of Grade Contracts in Human Development and Family Studies Courses
    By Patrick Cheek, Jennifer Reinke, Julie DellaMattera
  • 159-14 - 159-14 - Culturally and Developmentally Appropriate Education of Children About Peace and Violence
    By Judith Myers-Walls, Joellen Lewsader, Kailyn Wales
  • 159-15 - 159-15 - An Evaluation of Program Outcomes for Parents in the Baby Sign Program
    By Savanna Jellison, Sean Brotherson
  • 159-16 - 159-16 - Understanding Fathers of Children with DS: Developing Targeted Programs
    By Gail Bentley, Shera Thomas-Jackson, Briana Nelson Goff, Nicole Springer
  • 159-17 - 159-17 - The Boundaries Program: Why Teaching Boundaries to Parents and Youth Is Important
    By Brooke Hanson, Meagan Scott, Sean Brotherson, Geoffrey Zehnacker
  • 159-18 - 159-18 - Studying Conflict and Trauma Abroad: Effective and Ethical Program Design
    By Tonya Ricklefs, Jessica Cless
  • 159-19 - 159-19 - A New Measure for Assessing Parents’ Perceptions of the Value of Children
    By Carolyn Henry, Todd Spencer, Chao Liu, Scott Plunkett
  • 159-20 - 159-20 - Using Art and Digital Media to Create Effective Educational Materials
    By Dave Smallen
  • 159-21 - 159-21 - Parent Attitude Outcomes for Military-Affiliated Participants in the Nurturing Parenting Program
    By Geoffrey Zehnacker, Sean Brotherson, Brooke Hanson
  • 159-22 - 159-22 - Evaluating FLE Use of Family Life Coaching Technique with EHS Home Visitors
    By Bridget Walsh, Rose Steffen
  • 159-23 - 159-23 - Development and Validation of the Home Executive Function Environment (HEFE) Scale
    By Sara Schmitt, Irem Korucu, Lindsey Bryant, David Purpura
  • (ROUNDTABLE CANCELLED) 159-24 - 159-24 - Parenting in the Context of Race, Class, and Homelessness: Development an dInitial Pilot of Family Care Curriculum 2.0
    By Stephanie Krauthamer Ewing
  • 159-25 - 159-25 - Racial Socialization and Multicultural Experiences: Effects on White Views of Interracial Marriage
    By Annika Karlsen

Abstract(s)

159-01 - Using Photovoice to Uncover Perceptions of Poverty

By Cindy Aamlid

This project describes the use of photovoice as a pedagogical tool designed to uncover students’ deeply held beliefs of poverty and to generate engagement and discussion on difficult topics in the classroom.  The students in an undergraduate sociology course completed a series of assignments over the semester to photographically represent their perceptions of poverty in the community and critically reflect on those perceptions.  An assessment of photovoice as a teaching strategy indicates that the project helped students reevaluate their own perceptions, connect the topic to their experiences and the community, and share their own voice in the classroom.   

Objectives

To describe a teaching strategy that uses photovoice assignments in the classroom.To evaluate the effectiveness of photovoice as a pedagogical tool centered on uncovering students’ deeply held beliefs of poverty.To evaluate the effectiveness of photovoice as a teaching strategy to increase engagement on difficult topics in the classroom.

159-02 - Empowering International Teaching Assistants and Engaging students: Addressing the Use of Linguistic Evaluations to Express Culture and Other Bias

By Yanqun Peng, Maxi-Ann Campbell

This review paper analyzed the implicit bias, stereotypes and prejudice students have against International teaching assistants (ITAs), and its impact on teaching and student learning outcomes. It also reviewed the relationship approach to reduce bias and prejudice. We analyzed the effectiveness of using a relationship approach for ITAs and students, and provided some strategies for ITAs and students. The approach suggests ITAs help students to reduce anxiety of the unknown when taking ITAs’ classes for the first time, communicate with students through an intercultural lens, such as sharing cultural background, and cope with hurtful feelings in a non-judgmental attitude. It also requires students to take a role in forming relationships and having a supportive attitude regarding cultural diversity.

Objectives

To demonstrate the language struggles of international teaching assistants (ITA)To analyze the underlining problems of their language struggles: Undergraduate’s bias, stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.To provide alternative solutions: promote relationships between ITAs and students.

159-03 - Pedagogical Strategies for Addressing the Challenges of Teaching Family Policy

By Tammy Harpel

 The purpose of this roundtable is to share and facilitate dialogue about pedagogical strategies for an undergraduate family policy class.  In particular, the strategies will be presented within the context of the following four challenges Bogenschneider (2006) identified as experienced by instructors of family policy:  (1) Describing and demystifying the esoteric topic of family policy; (2) Distinguishing family policy from other policy courses; (3) Deciding how to teach a fluid subject with shifting content; and (4) Dealing with diverse values and political perspectives (Bogenschneider, 2006, p. 21-22).  During the roundtable, the presenter will share instructions for strategies and assignments and facilitate dialogue and exchange of resources among roundtable attendees.

Objectives

Attendees will be able to list the challenges experienced by instructors of family policy courses.Attendees will gain pedagogical resources to use in family policy courses.Attendees will generate ideas for dealing with the challenges of teaching family policy courses.

159-04 - Increasing Critical Thinking and Practical Skills Through Problem-Based Learning Simulations

By Alisha Hardman, Dorothy Berglund, Lori Elmore-Staton

Experiential learning approaches, such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) and simulations (S), are designed to increase critical thinking skills and practical skills, particularly with complex problems. These techniques have been widely implemented in the preparation of nurses and other health professionals. Family science students need to be prepared to address the challenges that contemporary families experience in a world that is complex, increasingly interconnected, and culturally diverse. Therefore, PBL-S has tremendous potential to better equip family science students with critical thinking and practical skills that will enable them to address the complex nature of the problems families encounter.

Objectives

To briefly review the literature on experiential learning approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) and simulations in other disciplines.To describe the implementation of PBL-S as part of the Foundations for OutReach through Experiential Child Advocacy Studies Training (FORECAST) project.To illustrate the application of this content knowledge by describing how PBL-S can be translated in family science classrooms using the Domains of Family Practice (DFP) model.

159-05 - Interprofessional Collaboration: Getting Family Science on the Team

By Catherine Breneman

Interprofessional education (IPE) prepares students for effective participation as members of the interprofessional team in a wide variety of settings with diverse populations. This presentation describes a model for teaching Family Science students about interprofessional collaboration, its benefits, challenges, and outcomes. The results of a qualitative analysis will be presented, along with recommendations for the implementation and development of interprofessional educational opportunities in a Family Science curriculum. The educational preparation in the knoweldge and skills for successful interprofessional collaboration allows Family Science students to develop competence and confidence, which ultimately leads to better outcomes for individuals, families, and communities.

Objectives

1. Describe a model for interprofessional education in Family Science curriculm.2. Identify three barriers to the implementation of interprofessional collboration in the Family Science curriculum.3.  Explain three benefits of interprofessional education.

159-06 - Teaching Translational Research and Dissemination to Family Science Students Through an Infographic Assignment

By Jennifer Doty, Carol Buess, Mollie Buelow

Translation of research and disseminating family science knowledge is a critical skill for students and new professionals. Guided by experiential learning theory, the aim of this abstract is to present the objectives and process of using an Infographic Assignment to teach research and dissemination skills in an introductory class that surveys the field of Family Science. The objectives of this assignment are 1) to research a current topic related to Family Science, 2) to visually represent a clear, engaging message based on research using an infographic, and 3) to learn about current family topics and research from fellow students. In this presentation, we share a guided 8-week process for introducing and scaffolding a successful experience with the infographic assignment.

Objectives

1) to research a current topic related to Family Science2) to visually represent a clear, engaging message based on research using an infographic 3) to learn about current family topics and research from fellow students

159-07 - Creating and Facilitating Webinars: A Tool for Family Science Professionals to Engage Learners

By Amy Kelly, Scott Tobias

Due to their affordability and accessibility, webinars are a viable tool for family science professionals to engage colleagues, students and families in an educational environment increasingly supplemented by distance learning. Though webinars are valuable in disseminating information, first-time webinar development can be both an exciting and daunting opportunity. The proposed resource exchange aims to share the experiences and resources generated by two members of an affiliate council who designed, constructed, and executed a webinar for the first time. Concluding this resource exchange, attendees will be able to: 1) appraise the advantages and disadvantages of webinars as a method to engage leaners, 2) distinguish the steps of successful webinar construction and execution, and 3) identify popular options for recording, presenting and promoting a webinar. 

Objectives

The following objectives guide the proposed resource exchange:To demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of webinars as a method to engage learners.To delineate the steps of successful webinar construction and execution.To describe popular options for recording, presenting and promoting a webinar.

159-08 - Building Authentic Relationships With Students From Diverse Backgrounds: Reflections and Recommendations

By Jana Meinhold, Sarah Feeney, Doris Cancel-Tirado

This paper explores the academic advising experiences of three female tenure-line faculty at institutions serving increasing numbers of first-generation and underrepresented student groups. Student data and enrollment trends from three public universities in Oregon and Washington State are presented and explored. Utilizing the Relational Cultural Theory lens, we discuss our experiences advising underrepresented students and explore how our personal backgrounds shape our investment in advising and mentoring. Finally, we discuss how we fulfill and balance the roles of our tenure-line positions, while maintaining our mentoring and advising relationships. The paper concludes with recommendations for how institutions might support faculty in their advising roles as the student population continues to diversify.

Objectives

Explore the changing landscape of enrollment of first-generation and underrepresented student groups in higher education in the northwest region of the US.Examine and reflect on the role of tenure-line faculty in supporting first-generation and underrepresented student groups.Recommend strategies for supporting faculty who are balancing scholarly, teaching, and service expectations, while valuing high quality advising with their students.

159-09 - GIFs, Memes, and Infographics, Oh My! Using Technology to Enhance Student Engagement and Understanding in Family Science Courses

By Lisa Moyer

This workshop will focus on sharing ideas for increasing student engagement and critical thinking through the use of GIFs, memes, and infographics in family science courses. Research has indicated the infographics and memes are beneficial for teaching students how to understand and illustrate concepts, present research, and facilitate critical thinking in college courses (De la Rosa-Carrillo, 2015; Stones, 2017; VanderMolen & Spivey, 2017). Participants will learn how to create GIFs, memes, and infographics and adapt materials to fit their own family science courses.

Objectives

1. Participants will learn how to create educational memes, GIFs, and infographics.2. Participants will be provided with "how to" instructional guides and videos so that they can adapt the various assignments presented in this workshop for their own courses.3. Participants will learn what the research shows about using memes, GIFs, and infographics to increase student motivation and engagement.

159-10 - You May Be What They Were Then:  A Look at Your Family Through the Use of a Genogram or Family Tree

By Kaye Sears, Brandon Burr, Glee Bertram, Andreae McGinnis

A genogram could include the following potentially required by a counselor, therapist, college course instructor, court system or others: Identify six chosen trends; health and illness, professions, recreational interests, namesakes, divorces/no divorces, educational situations, military, geographic location, ethnicity, etc. A narrative that discusses each trend with information about how the trend affects a person in the future and if they want to encourage or discourage the trend. The most important and valuable aspect about constructing a genogram is that it is an orderly way of obtaining a family history and organizing it.  The trends help to review the past and use it to make plans for the future. Reports by groups who have completed a genogram as an assignment have found it very valuable.

Objectives

To identify trends that are a part of one's family history.To outline some steps using the genogram as a teaching tool in a university family relations class.To explain how genorgrams can help students become more aware of important aspects of the family in which they were born (family of origin).

159-11 - The Intersection of Teaching and My Identity

By Veronica Barrios, Katia Paz Goldfarb

The current paper presents the instruction process of an undergraduate course, Familias Latinas en los Estados Unidos (Latino Families in the United States), taught in Spanish at a large northeastern university. The lead author instructed the course for three years. The instruction of the course occurred through prompt reflections, current events, think-tank findings, learning through discussion, and video presentations. In the process of teaching, the instructor navigated with and for students her own identity. Experiences with discussing sensitive material in our native language and developing a sense of community, safety, and critical exploration are presented.

Objectives

To analyze my practice of teaching as an agent of change.To inform teaching practices that facilitate critical conversationsTo demonstrate the utility of minortized faculty in instructing courses for minoritized college students.

159-12 - Trigger Warning: Teaching Sensitive Topics Online

By Jessica Cless, Megan Taylor Kuykendoll

Encountering sensitive content in family science programs is common. While several recommendations to instructors have been made through both theoretical and empirical research, there is still a gap in addressing specific issues associated with teaching sensitive content online. Teaching sensitive content in an online course environment comes with several significant challenges, and can also provide some benefits to students. In this workshop, presenters will address the need for thoughtful and trauma-informed practices for online course design and teaching, as well as review strategies for overcoming barriers and strategically using the flexibility of the online envrionment for the benefit of students. 

Objectives

1. To introduce the need for thoughtful, trauma-informed course design and teaching practices in online family science courses. 2. To describe challenges associated with teaching sensitive content from a distance and provide suggestions for overcoming these barriers. 3. To describe how the flexibility of the online course environment can be used for students' benefit in courses that contain sensitive content. 

159-13 - The Use of Grade Contracts in Human Development and Family Studies Courses

By Patrick Cheek, Jennifer Reinke, Julie DellaMattera

The goals of this roundtable are to demonstrate the use of grade contracts in Human Development and Family Studies (HDFS) courses, share experiences of successes and shortfalls implementing and using grade contracts, and exchange knowledge with other professionals who have also used grade contracts or wish to implement grade contracts. This roundtable will bring together the perspectives of faculty members at two universities who have used grade contracts in undergraduate HDFS courses with traditional and nontraditional students. Preliminary findings from ongoing research are discussed.

Objectives

Demonstrate the use of grade contracts in HDFS courses.Share successes and shortfalls of implementing and using grade contracts.Exchange knowledge with other professionals who have also used grade contracts or wish to implement grade contracts.

159-14 - Culturally and Developmentally Appropriate Education of Children About Peace and Violence

By Judith Myers-Walls, Joellen Lewsader, Kailyn Wales

This presentation will provide a demonstration of activities to use with children of different developmental levels. The activities could be used in family, classroom, or youth group settings to facilitate the forming of positive responses to violence and challenges to peace. The activities are developmentally appropriate for children aged 3 to 12 years old. The presentation also will provide a method of assessing the effectiveness of these curricular methods.

Objectives

Participants will be able to correlate activities to the six developmental levels of children’s understanding of peace.Participants will be able to apply the six developmental levels to other activities and discussion questions.Participants will be able to discuss methods for evaluating the effectiveness of peace education curricula.

159-15 - An Evaluation of Program Outcomes for Parents in the Baby Sign Program

By Savanna Jellison, Sean Brotherson

The deliberate use and teaching of symbolic gestures (i.e representational) through parent modeling as a way of communication with a child who is not yet capable of verbal speech and is not hearing impaired is referred to as Baby Sign. Baby Sign is currently a growing and popular adapted sign language to promote early communication between children and parents. The intent of this study was to explore Baby Sign as a parent training intervention and whether it might assist with parent-child understanding and communication. A retrospective post-then-pre design was used to gather feedback from 28 participants in three complete pilot sessions of the Baby Sign course. Participants expressed high satisfaction with the class and showed positive gains in knowledge and usage of baby sign.

Objectives

The key objectives of this study were:To design an initial program evaluation for use with participating parents in the Baby Sign program;To gather feedback from parent participants and assess perceptions of program value and impact regarding the Baby Sign program;To explore implications of teaching Baby Sign as a parent training intervention and whether it might assist with parent-child understanding, communication, and emotion management.  

159-16 - Understanding Fathers of Children with DS: Developing Targeted Programs

By Gail Bentley, Shera Thomas-Jackson, Briana Nelson Goff, Nicole Springer

The goal of this resource exchange roundtable is to disseminate findings on fathers of children with Down syndrome (DS) to Family Life Educators (FLEs), and support them in providing innovated, targeted services to this population of fathers. Raising a child with DS brings challenges to family life that are both different and similar to those faced by families with typically developing children. The needs of fathers are often overlooked and not included, but much needed. This roundtable will provide a better understanding of fathers of children with DS that will inform FLEs in program development.

Objectives

After this roundtable presentation participants should be able to:Describe the research findings about Dads of children with DSTranslate those findings into a useful implementation for creating programs focused on those dadsPlan ways to innovatively present supportive programs to fathers

159-17 - The Boundaries Program: Why Teaching Boundaries to Parents and Youth Is Important

By Brooke Hanson, Meagan Scott, Sean Brotherson, Geoffrey Zehnacker

Youth often lack the maturity to make good decisions on their own and require firm guidance from parents/guardians to reach adulthood successfully. Thus, learning to set boundaries is an integral element of healthy youth development for parents and youth. A 5-week program, Boundaries and Boundaries, Jr., utilizes multiple delivery methods for both youth and their parents to delve into understanding the need, importance, and process of establishing boundaries. Previous program youth participants showed a 50% improvement in knowing how to respectfully work through boundary disagreements, while adult participants reported a 71% improvement in understanding their individual parenting style.

Objectives

To understand the importance of boundary and rule setting among parents and youth.To demonstrate the logistics of the Boundaries program.To evaluate the effectiveness of the Boundaries program.

159-18 - Studying Conflict and Trauma Abroad: Effective and Ethical Program Design

By Tonya Ricklefs, Jessica Cless

There are several benefits associated with study abroad programs for future human service professionals, including increased cultural sensitivity (Lindsey, 2005) and recognizing multiple realities (Healy, 2003). International experiences focused on the study of conflict and trauma have been specifically noted as important for student development of a global perspective of how individuals and families navigate pain and hardship. Despite the benefits for students, several challenges and ethical considerations may be present as instructors of family science programs develop and plan these programs. This workshop will summarize the importance and challenges associated with conflict and trauma-focused study abroad programs, as well as provide specific suggestions related to program design and assessment in order to support ethical and effective international experiences.

Objectives

1. To articulate the need for conflict and trauma-focused study abroad programs in family science. 2. To describe challenges associated with ethical concerns and effective assessment of study abroad programs with a conflict and trauma focus. 3. To provide suggestions related to program design and assessment in order to support ethical and effective international experiences.

159-19 - A New Measure for Assessing Parents’ Perceptions of the Value of Children

By Carolyn Henry, Todd Spencer, Chao Liu, Scott Plunkett

Value of Children (VOC) theory proposes that children fulfill functions and meet psychological needs. We developed a 27 item Advantages of Children Scale conceptualized as representing six themes. The construct validity and reliability of the scale was examined using confirmatory factor analysis on data from 789 emerging adult men non-fathers that identified as Latino or Caucasian. The results supported the construct validity and  reliability of the six factors: connectedness, expansion of self, adult status and social identity, family heritage, development of self, and family maintenance. Cronbach’s alphas ranged from .83 to .91. Implications are presented.

Objectives

Participants will learn fundamental aspects of the Value of Children theory as an approach to understanding fertility and parenting.Participants learn six functions and psychological needs children meet for their parents.Participants will become familiar with the construct validity and reliability of the Advantages of Children Scale and how it can be used in research and family life education. 

159-20 - Using Art and Digital Media to Create Effective Educational Materials

By Dave Smallen

Art and digital media may be leveraged to make family science education captivating and accessible. We created an online psychoeducational module that uses original illustrations and narrative prose to explain how emotional intimacy develops in close relationships: The Art and Science of Human Connection (www.humanconnection.us). A randomized experiment indicated that the module effectively promoted understanding and adaptive skills around emotional intimacy for a sample of college students, who also responded positively to the art and narrative approach to dissemination. Further uses of art and media to creatively disseminate research around relational and family well-being will be discussed.

Objectives

To discuss the benefits of using various artistic and digital media approaches to education around individual, couple, and family processes.To demonstrate the process of translating theory into narrative and visual art.To showcase The Art and Science of Human Connection module as an example of art based educational media.  

159-21 - Parent Attitude Outcomes for Military-Affiliated Participants in the Nurturing Parenting Program

By Geoffrey Zehnacker, Sean Brotherson, Brooke Hanson

For military service members, significant stressors may occur for individuals, partners, and children due to adjustments to training, separation, deployment, service, reunification and other factors. The Nurturing Parenting program is a parent training program based on social learning theory and is designed to assess, treat and prevent or ameliorate abusive parenting attitudes and practices. In 2015-16, 5.6 percent of NPP participants in North Dakota were military affiliated while an additional 6.4 percent were partnered with a military service member. This study examined parental attitude variables among military affiliated participants in the program and outcomes associated with program involvement. The data suggest that the NPP is having a modest and positive impact on those military affiliated individuals who participate and complete the 4-month parenting program.

Objectives

1) To examine the effectiveness of a parent training program designed to prevent or ameliorate abusive parenting attitudes and practices with military affiliated participants. 2) To analyze program effects of the Nurturing Parenting program with military affiliated individuals on parental attitude constructs associated with abusive or neglectful parenting.3) To explore how participation in the Nurturing Parenting program affects military affiliated individuals and implications for making program adjustments to be more relevant to their specific context.

159-22 - Evaluating FLE Use of Family Life Coaching Technique with EHS Home Visitors

By Bridget Walsh, Rose Steffen

Coaching has been proposed as a technique that FLEs can use to provide program-level support for professionals such as EHS HVs. To address a current lack of evaluation in the family life coaching (FLC) literature, the current study applied FLC hallmarks discussed by Allen (2016) and evaluated FLC conducted by a CFLE with EHS HVs. According to the Clifton StrengthsFinder, home visitors are highly skilled in relationship-building. Results also demonstrate a clear positive trend in evaluations over time as a result of incorporating FLC with EHS HVs. The home visitors unanimously endorsed FLC by a CFLE as valuable. 

Objectives

To describe hallmarks of a four-month individualized coaching intervention by a CFLE using FLC techniques with Early Head Start Home Visitors.To identify EHS HV themes from the Clifton StrengthsFinder and organize them by domain (Executing, Influencing, Relationship Building, Strategic Thinking).To compare home visitors’ evaluations of coaching from the start to finish of the professional development program using qualitative and quantitative analysis.   

159-23 - Development and Validation of the Home Executive Function Environment (HEFE) Scale

By Sara Schmitt, Irem Korucu, Lindsey Bryant, David Purpura

The primary aim of this study is to establish the validity of the Home Executive Functioning (EF) Environment (HEFE) scale, a measure that reflects parent-child activities that may support the development of young children’s self-regulation. The study sample consists of 1109 parents of preschool-aged children. Participants completed the HEFE scale as well as measures of child EF. Preliminary results indicate a three-factor structure of the HEFE scale. Further, each factor is significantly correlated with two measures of preschool children’s EF. These study findings may have implications for intervention work targeting families to promote EF in the home environment.

Objectives

To evaluate the factor structure of the Home Executive Functioning (EF) Environment Scale.To examine the predictive validity of the Home EF Environment Scale.To demonstrate the utility of the Home EF Environment Scale for identifying potential targets for home-based interventions designed to improve preschool children's EF.

159-25 - Racial Socialization and Multicultural Experiences: Effects on White Views of Interracial Marriage

By Annika Karlsen

Nationally, the rate of intimate interracial partnerships including interracial marriages continues to rise. However, many White adults still oppose interracial marriage at higher rates than any other form of interracial mingling including friendships or work relationships. Therefore, views on interracial marriages can serve as a proxy for understanding White’s modern racial views including prejudice. This study aims to explore the associations between childhood racial socialization and adult multicultural experiences on views of interracial marriage. Implications for educational practices are discussed.

Objectives

1) Consider childhood racial socialization (Vittrup, 2016) and contact theory (Pettigrew, 1998) to understand various familial and contextual factors that may be influential in decreasing prejudice views towards interracial marriage among White college students.
2) Explore interaction effects between childhood racial socialization and adult multicultural experiences to determine significant and non-significant relations between variables (childhood and adult racial experiences) and outcome measure (interracial marriage views)
3) Provide information on transformational experiences leading White college students to develop more favorable racial views to inform interventions aimed at building positive interracial relationships. 

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