Substance Use and Child, Adolescent, and Adult Health Outcomes

Concurrent Sessions 7

Sihong Liu, Assaf Oshri, Jing Zhang, Natasha Slesnick, Junhan Cho, Steven Kogan, Alicia Smith, Spencer Bradshaw, Mazie Zielinski, Natira Mullet, Lindsey Hawkins, Megan Story, Olivia Diggs, Tricia Neppl

Facilitator: Katharine Didericksen

3:00 PM
4:15 PM
Location
Royal Palm 4
Session #
242
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 242-01 - Growth Patterns of Parental Alcoholism and Maltreated Youths' Binge Drinking
    By Sihong Liu, Assaf Oshri
  • 242-02 - Academic Performance and Delinquent and Aggressive Behaviors Among Children With Substance-Misusing Mothers
    By Jing Zhang, Natasha Slesnick
  • 242-03 - Oxytocin Receptor Gene Methylation Linking Early Adversity to Substance Use Among Young Black Men
    By Junhan Cho, Steven Kogan, Alicia Smith
  • (PAPER CANCELLED) 242-04 - Parenting Obstacles for Rural Mothers Seeking Treatment for a Substance Use Disorder: Mothers' and Service Providers’ Perspectives
    By Laura Nelson
  • 242-05 - Examining Codependency Through Neuroimaging of PFC Activity
    By Spencer Bradshaw, Mazie Zielinski, Natira Mullet, Lindsey Hawkins, Megan Story
  • 242-06 - Binge Drinking in Adulthood: The Family Stress Model Over Time
    By Olivia Diggs, Tricia Neppl

Abstract(s)

Growth Patterns of Parental Alcoholism and Maltreated Youths' Binge Drinking

By Sihong Liu, Assaf Oshri

Employing a developmental psychopathology perspective and the family system theory, this study constructed a latent growth curve model to test how growth patterns of parental alcoholism can influence maltreated adolescents’ binge drinking behaviors over time. Data from a nationally representative longitudinal sample of 884 adolescents and their families involved in the child protective service for child maltreatment across three time-points were employed. Results suggested that parental alcoholism initial level was positively associated with more youth’s binge drinking at time-point 1. Parents’ rate of increase in alcohol use problems over time was related to adolescents’ increased binge drinking over time.

Objectives

To test a model that would benefit harm reduction programs targeting at adolescent alcohol use problems.To apply a developmental psychopathology perspective to investigate parental alcohol use problems in the family system.To test the influence of parental alcoholism over time on adolescent alcohol use problems. 

Academic Performance and Delinquent and Aggressive Behaviors Among Children With Substance-Misusing Mothers

By Jing Zhang, Natasha Slesnick

The present study examined the longitudinal trajectory of academic performance and associated ecological correlates among children with substance misusing mothers. The effects of academic performance on delinquent and aggressive behaviors were also examined. The sample consisted of 183 children whose mothers sought outpatient treatment. The mean age of participants was 11.5 years (SD = 2.6). Results showed an association between positive parenting behaviors, adaptive coping strategies and better academic performance among children. Moreover, children showing higher level of academic performance exhibited lower levels of delinquent and aggressive behaviors. These findings provide valuable intervention information for academic performance and behavioral outcomes among children with substance misusing mothers.

Objectives

To examine the longitudina trajectory of academic performance among children with substance misusing mothers.
To identify ecological correlates that are associated with the change of academic performance.To examine the promotive effects of academic performance in ameliorating delinquent and aggressive behaviors.

Oxytocin Receptor Gene Methylation Linking Early Adversity to Substance Use Among Young Black Men

By Junhan Cho, Steven Kogan, Alicia Smith

Focusing on 329 young African American men living rural Georgia, this study investigated the potential role of methylation in oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) as a mediator linking childhood adversity to increases in substance abuse in emerging adulthood. Also, the mediational processes linking adverse childhood environments to substance abuse were expanded by considering gene by environment interaction effects of the G-allele of a common variant (rs53576) in OXTR. Our findings suggest important roles of OXTR methylation and genetic variation in explaining biological mechanisms linking childhood adversity to substance abuse at the genetic level.

Objectives

1. To investigate the high prevanlence of substance abuse among African American young men living rural South.2. To examine the potential role of methylation in oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) as a mediator linking childhood adversity to increases in substance abuse in emerging adulthood. 3. To analyze the genetic moderation effects of OXTR genotype on the association of childhood adversity with OXTR methylation as well as substance abuse during young adulthood.

Parenting Obstacles for Rural Mothers Seeking Treatment for a Substance Use Disorder: Mothers' and Service Providers’ Perspectives

By Laura Nelson

This study investigates the parenting obstacles mothers face while seeking treatment for a substance use disorder (SUD) in a rural community. We conducted interviews with mothers with an SUD who were actively seeking treatment and with area service providers to discuss parenting obstacles mothers face that may hinder their participation in an SUD treatment program. Through analysis and coding, several themes emerged regarding the internal and external barriers to substance abuse treatment that rural mothers encounter while parenting. Some of these barriers included limited respite, financial instability, and unsafe housing. Barriers are important in considering appropriate gendered and parenting specific SUD treatment program development.

Objectives

1) Understand the types of barriers mothers face when trying to access substance abuse treatment. 2) Examine how mothers conceptualize their experiences at the intersection of motherhood and substance abuse treatment. 3) Describe how future interventions can alleviate barriers that mothers face when accessing substance abuse treatment.

Examining Codependency Through Neuroimaging of PFC Activity

By Spencer Bradshaw, Mazie Zielinski, Natira Mullet, Lindsey Hawkins, Megan Story

Addiction is considered to be a family disease that can lead to family members becoming codependent on their addicted loved-one. Family members within an addicted system often display similar symptoms as their addicted loved-one leading to family members needing to find their own recovery. The current study looks at family members Span-Fischer codependency scores and their Prefrontal Cortex (PFC) activation patterns when viewing different types of stimuli. Specifically, the aim of this study is to assess how family member’s codependency scores correlate with their prefrontal cortex response patterns when viewing an image of their addicted loved-one. While research has shown the negative repercussions addiction has on family members, there is little research examining brain activation patterns. Implications for treatment and recovery processes will be discussed.

Objectives

Explain how codependency may influence family member recovery from addiction using neuroimaging to demonstrate how codependency correlates with prefrontal cortex activation patterns when viewing images of their addicted loved-one.Expand research findings and comprehension of the impacts addiction has on brain functioning and family member recovery.Demonstrate the clinical implications of the relationship between codependency and the neurological responses of the PFC and how it relates to family member recovery.

Binge Drinking in Adulthood: The Family Stress Model Over Time

By Olivia Diggs, Tricia Neppl

This study examined pathways of the Family Stress Model (FSM) on adolescent binge drinking into adulthood. A prospective, longitudinal design was used to include parent report of economic hardship, economic pressure, emotional distress, and harsh couple interaction, as well as observer ratings of harsh parenting. Adolescent report of binge drinking in late adolescence and adulthood were used. Results support pathways of the FSM where economic hardship led to economic pressure, which was associated with emotional distress, parental conflict, and harsh parenting. Harsh parenting was related to binge drinking. This study extends research by predicting late adolescent binge drinking into adulthood.

Objectives

To test the original pathways of the Family Stress Model.To extend previous research by predicting late adolescent binge drinking into adulthood.To evaluate how mothers and fathers uniquely influence late adolescent binge drinking into adulthood. 

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